Saturday, 28 September 2013

Always something to discover....

What is it?
I would have described myself as a pretty experienced GP, and certainly 33 years in a full-time job would prepare you for anything, and I have seen pretty much every condition in my time, including a lot of rare ones.

I have seen and diagnosed Wegener's granulomatosis, and Hayley-Hayley disease, I have seen all the rare childhood cancers including Wilms' tumour, so I wasn't expecting to be surprised by a condition I had not heard of.

Since retiring, I have started to do quite a bit of walking. It is hard work when you have the physique of a prop forward, and the weight to match (and a bit extra for the added pies), but I am persevering. This means that I am meeting with people who walk, and have come across a condition that is new to me: Golfer's Vasculitis. This is an irritating purpuric rash that occurs in people after they have walked for a while. It seems more common in older people, and in women. It occurs after longer walks, and not in runners.

It is entirely benign, and is diagnosed on the history and examination (tests aren't necessary provided the walker is well), but is a little unsightly, and takes a few days to subside.

You can take the doctor out of medical practice, but can't stop a doctor thinking and analysing like a doctor!

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

You might find this amusing! http://theoccasionalpigeon.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/new-government-plan-to-beat-obesity.html

WendyCarole said...

I have had this. Two longish walks on the Scottish holiday.

Anonymous said...

"It is hard work when you have the physique of a prop forward, and the weight to match".....I fell off my chair laughing at that comment.

PPLIC said...

Bril­liant! Great talk that was extremely insightful and very enter­taining. It’s given me loads to think about.

Anonymous said...

I had this when I was 18 on a duke of Edinburgh trip... 10 miles into the beacons and it gave the instructors and me a hell of a fright. Funnily enough a retired GP walking the same trail as us saw me sat at a bench with my ailment and offered his diagnosis. I didn't have it again for years until I was 30 walking up and down a very hot cardiac unit on my 4th long day (12 hours) as a Nurse. It was 28*C outside and the hospital didn't get the memo about the Air Con being on. Seeing as it's taboo to open windows.

Anonymous said...

I have just come across this blog for the first time and read to this story. So interesting, I had a chap in during the late summer who had been walking through the high rough in St Andrews and came in to see me with a vasculitic rash on his legs. Not bothering him at all, clinically well and bloods all normal. I reviewed him again a few days later just to check and it had resolved! Now I know the diagnosis! At the time he/we thought it must have been an odd reaction to sprayed chemicals in the grass. Thanks

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Saeed Zia said...

Its really a tough job; you figure is capable to support ahead….. its to heavy… I am actually astonished…

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